Film School to Tech Startup

In this episode of the Mid Life Entrepreneurs podcast, we meet StJohn Smith, founder of tech startup Quick Class and we delve into everything from the pros and cons of going to film school and how the best investment he ever made was in 73 sessions of gestalt therapy and finally we explore how AI will fundamentally change our lives.

Watch the full-length interview with StJohn Smith on YouTube then click below

Resources

Note: some of the resources above may be affiliate links, meaning I get paid a commission (at no extra cost to you) if you use that link to make a purchase.

Support the show

If you want to support the show with a small monthly donation then click over to Patreon

Come and join our community on Facebook

Sponsors

This show is sponsored by Audible a great place to read a book with your ears! To get a free audiobook plus 30 days of free access, click this link Audible

Full Transcript

Kevin H. Boyd:
Midlife Entrepreneurs Podcast Number 12.

Stjohn Smith:

being alive during the wonder of the first sparks of silicon sentience is a remarkable moment in history and to live through in history.

Kevin H. Boyd:

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible. Audible is offering you, dear listener, a free audiobook with a 30-day trial membership. Just go to audible trial.com forward slash midlife and browse through their vast selection of audio programs. Download a free title and start listening. It’s that easy. Go to audible trial.com forward slash upward spiral coaching to get started listening today.

Kevin H. Boyd:
In this episode of the Midlife Entrepreneurs podcast, we meet StJohn Smith, founder of tech startup Quick Class and we delve into everything from the pros and cons of going to film school and how the best investment StJohn ever made was in 73 sessions of gestalt therapy. And finally, we talk about how artificial intelligence will fundamentally change all our lives.

Stjohn Smith:
This is the upward spiral podcasts, uh, today interviewing StJohn Smith, I run something Kevin called Quick Class, which is a cloud-based, very APP centric learning management system platform for SME training organizations. And we work with them. And we provide them a turnkey solution to that and m-learning and e-learning conundrums and and pain points and issues and challenges they face in getting what they do already brilliantly well in the classroom to that student in Beijing who also wants to experience something of their knowledge and their wisdom but can’t possibly come to London and go to a classroom for a few weeks. How did your business come about? It evolved from a film festival that I ran for a decade in 15 countries around the world call quick flick, which started in the shoebox apartments in Manhattan in 2001 when a group of us got together post-film school and I’d gone to New York Film Academy the previous year wherein four or five months I sort of learned the basics of filmmaking.

Stjohn Smith:
And before that I had been a corporate monkey, for Unilever for over five years and if so, how was that? It was a certain foundation for many things and they gave me an amazing experience and of sending me to New York after a couple of years. I was an amazing opportunity. And you know, going from Warrington to Bedford to Manhattan was some acceleration there. That was the typical, that was the proper hockey stick, wasn’t it? And then put it out on a graph and a so yeah. But once in Manhattan, and I think I realized that I didn’t want to be a corporate monkey by my mid-forties and so you went to film school and films called obvious choice. Yes. Really worry a at that moment in that time you really want to yeah. Yeah. What was the thing that the worst thing a man can do to his hair as to tell them I’m going to become an artist?

Stjohn Smith:
Uh, yeah. So, and then necessarily know I wanted to be an artist, but I had fallen in love with film, with my first DV Camera I bought in 98 and taught myself to edit on a Pentium two desk. Wow. Tower, thats going back. Absolutely. It was great. It was great. And it was just open a whole new world. So that was my passion growing at night from almost when I arrived in New York. And, uh, and then so, so did it. The honour of going to film school learns all the bits and pieces in between, you know, storyboarding and three-way lighting and working with actors and um, and then, and then started a little production house with a guy called John from, uh, New Orleans and we ended up working with the same corporate monkeys. We’ve been trying to escape from that in the end anyway because, you know, ultimately consumer research videos, somehow we’re paying the bills.

Stjohn Smith:
And uh, but at night time, uh, we, we were gathering in our shoe box apartments and decided that we wanted to encourage one another and a group of about 10 of us, uh, who wants to meet monthly with the short film that we’d all individually made up to about three minutes long on a common theme like stairwell or nudity or cocktails. So we choose a theme and then we give ourselves a month to go away and call ourselves quick flick. And a, and I took that idea to Sao Paulo, Brazil, where I moved the following year in 2002 chase love to the tropics where at a production house named Trattoria de framee. They uhh, they adopted me as like the Gringo, the inhouse gringo and wasn’t quite sure what the hell I was doing there. But they were lovely. And I did a lot of post production, uh, lots of after effects stuff with them, but also learnt Portuguese and they, and they learned a little bit of English and in return and a, and whilst they’re there, assistant editors and I were talking about this thing we’d started in New York called Quick Flick and they thought that sounds really cool.

Stjohn Smith:
So we thought, well, why don’t, why don’t we start, we’ll start a group here. Why not? You know, so few of us got together as February, 2003, I guess. And, uh, and it was amazing what they did with it because they, were super talented, once we started, you know, sharing between New York and in Sao Paulo, it was like, well, what if, what if we could do this in a dozen cities around the world? You know, what, if you could start this in the creative capital’s suddenly, you know, created some momentum or gone viral I suppose in some way. You know, when people start hearing about something and it becomes interesting enough for them to go, let’s do this here now. And we had over 400 screening parties over the course of a decade and about 40,000 people came and we inspired over 2000 films to be created on 73 themes.

Stjohn Smith:
So we had like a little grass root, you know, underground movement of creativity. And the whole, the concept was all about advancing tolerance and a cultural understanding by inspiring and debuting the best global filmmaking talent. So that was a, that was the, the under kind of rebuttal after doing it for 10 years. And Do, you know, and working on other people’s projects and other people’s companies to more or less help support the thing. Uh, it just got tiring and it’s own it’s own steam to running quickly because there’s no, it’s not, it’s on hiatus our can until it’s successful, which is a quick class, which is, this LMS has grown out of festival trying to inject quick flick into schools. So the idea was to say, hey, you know, this would be a great extracurricular activity. But then we started talking to teachers and teachers like, well, you know, your festival sounds really cool.

Stjohn Smith:
Congratulations. But we’ve got some exams, our students the pass and yeah. And ultimately, uh, what they were most interested in, the aspect of it, the most interesting thing was with the apps that we were describing, how we would, you know, do blah, blah, bloating for national winners, et Cetera, per section ideas. But, uh, but they were most interested in the apps for actually sharing their reference films in their students’ films, you know, amongst their students in the classrooms. So I started working with Bfi and it ruins a quick class. Uh, you know, to, to create supportive, um, you know, mobile learning platforms for students in particular film and media. Right. And, uh, and they really incubated us through, um, over a number of years and we started, you know, doing work as well with rain dance and uh, and then, uh, about a year ago, I guess quick class pivoted because you know, filming media teachers, you know, GCSE available ultimately don’t have the agency at the time or the budgets to choose their own LMS.

Stjohn Smith:
But there are a lot of training organizations out there that do. So it’s about being able to provide very specialized and customized. Hey, it’s funny how these things evolve and grow. Isn’t it? Weird journey from Unilever, from Warrington to Brighton via New York’s Apollo. One is errors, Madrid, Barcelona and London. Wow, that’s very impressive. Well went. Very weird. I think it would probably be on that. Anyway.

Kevin H. Boyd:
So what do you think you’ve learned from all of that experience and those, those 10 years of creating this films and being in different parts of the world? What we’ve taken from that

Stjohn Smith:
is be bold. People evolve. And I think from, you know, from, and then you never regret ultimately even if something turns out or you think, what have I got myself into now? It’s just, you know, who dares wins. I guess in a way, not even trying means you’re definitely going to fail.

Stjohn Smith:
Yes. Yeah. So it’s about, I guess from what, from all of that is that nothing, none of it ever can close to killing me. And so far has given me such an encyclopedia of amazing memories, you know? So I feel extremely blessed to have just thought, well what the hell? I think the nice thing about working for, you know, the Va and being and being in these, you know, these corporate was you really got a sense of, or like the beginnings of a sense of, well, this is, my soul is here for whatever reason isn’t going to be fulfilled in these whole ways out of the, you know, in these meetings, in these, you know, lovely sweets, you know, lovely hotels in this city or that city and you know, great expense account and meals, et cetera. But talking with people, you’re not necessarily choosing to have dinner with sort of obliged to

Kevin H. Boyd:
Well, my next question is, um, what motivates you every day to keep going?

Stjohn Smith:
Entrepreneur? I think fear of failure probably is number one. You know, like, oh Christ, I want to go back to those halls of corporate dullness and, you know, hey, I don’t want to talk it down, but I got, I know it’s not me. I’m probably more or less unemployable, but I’m always open to collaboration, you know? Um, but, um,

Stjohn Smith:
uh, so I think it’s just the desire first and foremost to maintain that freedom. Continue to be able to, um, to be able to decide what is it I’m going to do today rather than being told what I’m going to do today. So I think that’s probably the primary motivator and then just the world to be able to bring them, you know, really smart, uh, interesting people together on some sort of common mission or purpose that we can all get some pleasure out of doing as well. So, you know, that’s probably the second thing. Yeah. Yeah. It’s like, is it the teams you build and the possibilities you build together and that sense of, you know, common ownership of a number of issues together and how we all collaborate because it’s too big a task for just one of us to do on our own. So we’re all gonna, we’re all gonna chip in here. We’re all going to, you know, get our hands dirty.

Kevin H. Boyd:
How has failure set you up for later success and which is your favourite failure?

Stjohn Smith:
Wow. It’s, I guess, uh, the latest of many failures, um, was probably, yeah, the film or media teachers who ultimately didn’t have the time and he said we built them the perfect platform for which they didn’t have the time, the, you know, the agency or the budgets to invest in. And a, I suppose that was, you know, a number of years of work had gone into, you know, really developing this platform. But luckily it can be used for all sorts of subjects. So what came out of it was a pivot and you turn, you turn a pivot certainly to be able to offer our services to lots of different training organizations who are a lot more like us, which works a lot better for everybody. Um, and uh, so that was a, that was a failure, but it turned into something which is leading to a much bigger success, much more appropriate success in a way, you know, cause we’re helping, we’re able to help people who are much more like us and much more willing to work like us and more agile and more.

Stjohn Smith:
Yeah. If you told me if you’d May, I forget if I could have made a list of failures before I arrived and I could have taken up definitely the rest of the afternoon. You’re absolutely one after the other cabin usually already made you one every couple of years or so. But uh, yeah, carry on. Failing. But then you learned there’s get up, brush yourself off. Yeah, I guess. No, I know it certainly, certainly it is sometimes maybe even good to fail just to, you know, keep us humble. Ooh, maybe it can knock us down a peg and then we, and then we appreciate the next, we appreciate when we bounced back and successes even more. Maybe hopefully things generally get better in your life or that you don’t, you’re not going around that continuous loop of failure and just doing the Megan assays mistakes I get.

Stjohn Smith:
Even if you don’t, I think the bigger the lesson you have to learn, the more time you have to learn it. So you know. Yeah, maybe, well it depends how much, how much, how big the fail is, how much you do get, you know, knocks down, you know, first time round because it can be, yeah, it could be a map, but it surely the best, the bigger the failure that the less likely you are to going around to exactly the same thing again. Then a little failure way. You’re just like, oh damn it, here I am again. That was silly. It’s not gonna work. It didn’t work yesterday and it hasn’t worked today either. But you know, it’s the, as the big failures, like getting your bike stolen off the train. Yeah. In Brussels. That’s the sort of failure where you no longer travel with the bike out of your sight.

Stjohn Smith:
So a big failure is like, okay, now I’m going to do that again by cause either next to me or next to my legs were under. But you know, so. So that’s a big failure. That’s a very annoying failure. We have to buy a new bike, but you know, missing the train. Wow, you’ve lost 20 minutes of your life in which you’re going to sit on a bench or sit on the next train and answer a few more emails anyway. That’s not a big enough failure for you to defeated drastically change your behavior. So if you could impart one piece of wisdom to the world, what would it be? Just take a couple of minutes. It’s about gratitude and it’s just taking a couple of minutes every day to stop and just to spend the moment in wonder. The fact that we hear at all, you know, and absolutely one of the unlikeliness of having been born at this remarkable moment on a remarkable, you know, tiny.in this crazy universe and this spark of self knowledge and self feeling of being part of them and just existing as part of it all is a, is to something really amazing to focus on.

Stjohn Smith:
And I think that maybe a lot of the small stuff which upsets us and Lori’s us, um, can be, um, it can be all, it can be devouring. And I think that, you know, we, if we can rise above that, we can have a lot more patients with each other. We can have a lot more, we could have maybe a lot more consideration for the future of our species and the possibility that society will be able to exist in any sort of form and a hundred years.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Today’s show is brought to you by Audible. Audible is offering you, dear listener, a free audiobook with a 30-day free membership. Just go to audible, trial.com forward slash midlife and browse the vast selection of audio programmes they have. Download a title for free and start listening. It’s that easy. Go to audible.com forward slash midlife to get started today. Back when I was a youngster in the 20th century, I worked in the early tech industry which required me to read huge, thousand-page, computer manuals and I find it relatively easy to make sense of them, but today in the 21st century, I just don’t have time to sit down and read and I’ll be honest, I feel my brain just doesn’t enjoy reading pages and pages of texts anymore, but that has been transformed by using Audible because now I can listen to the longest and most complex books as I go for my evening walk around the park or even when I’m cooking as an example of that and currently listening to Jordan B.Peterson’s 30 hour epic, Maps of meaning. There’s no way I would read such a long and complicated book. But with audible I can dip in and out whenever I have a spare few minutes of downtime. I’m learning so much every day just by using audiobooks. So to download your free audiobook today, go to audible, trial.com forward slash midlife again, that’s audible, trial.com forward slash midlife. And you can get your free audiobook today.

Kevin H. Boyd:
What is the best or most worthwhile investment of money or time you’ve ever made?

Stjohn Smith:
The most worthwhile investment was probably 73 gestalt therapy sessions. 73. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But that’s it. Yeah, exactly. You got to count these things. Um, yeah, but that wasn’t being blatantly open about this. And I, I, I wasn’t very happy with either of them. My, my job at the time or my relationship and um, don’t have to be too specific about either of those. But um, yeah, I ended up going to a weekly session, so I think it added up to maybe about two and a half thousand pounds. But I remember thinking at the time, at the end of these 73 sessions, that must’ve been the best money I’ve ever spent. Because ultimately, if you’re investing latently in your own happiness, if you’re getting into, if you okay, if you have fundamental unhappiness in your life, seek some help because there’s, there’s a lot of people out there, doesn’t have to cost a lot of money.

Stjohn Smith:
It costs me because it was, you know, they’re one on one sessions, but I’m sure people who don’t have the means or the lack of being able to afford that, you know, who can go out and find and seek help because life’s too short to be, you know, really suffering if it on a mental level. And you know, somebody described antidepressants for example, which I wouldn’t go near and I’m sure there’s a minority of people. I don’t want to judge and you know, completely write off what pharmaceuticals can do for our general condition of extreme unhappiness or psychosis. But I think that, uh, it’s been described as dropping ice cubes into a boiling pot, you know, so you see what you want to do ultimately is turn down the flame, of the pot, rather than try to freeze the bloody thing from above. Right. If there is a flame causing you discomfort mentally or psychologically or emotionally, then figure out where to go and find somebody who’s going to turn you to help you turn the flame down.

Stjohn Smith:
And, uh, so I think that was probably my best investment when nobody’s ever asked me that before. But I’d never really, uh, except thinking of the time at the end of it. Wow. That was probably the best money spent. I would, I would agree. I think money spent on, I always say it’s the greatest luxury. I by myself. I used to go and have individual therapy every week and someone who will listen to you for 50 minutes. Yeah, yeah. Um, without judgment. Yeah. And that’s rare. Who isn’t a friend and it wasn’t going to lie to you cause I can just go to why it’s going to be a ride. Somebody who’s going to hold up a mirror a bit and go, why? Yeah, I agree.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Purchase of a hundred pounds or less has most positively impacted your life in the last year?

Stjohn Smith:
I guess, but that’s over a hundred pounds is under 39 pounds for my, my Airpods, you know, those little, those little joys of gadgetry which are frying my brain daily basis. These are the cordless one. Yeah, exactly. I have a bit of an obsession for cables. Oh yeah. So I’m very anti all this cordless stuff. Yeah. Uh, always have been. And I’m like, everything in the house is wired up. One is the intimate, because the thing about a cable is it just works. Yes. To doesn’t have to broadcast it throughout the entire neighbourhood. It just goes down to little cable, doesn’t need to be encoded, doesn’t need to be this encoded it nice and coated. That’s not even the word. Decode. Decode, it disinfected, disinfected your dencoding. You can tell I used to work in IT.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Just, yeah. So it’s like, and um, and it just speeds everything up. So, you know, it’s like people say, oh, why, you know, I bought the smart TV and the Internet is too slow. And I said I’ll just try plugging a cable from the modem into your TV. It will speed up. Yeah. And it becomes the cable costs a couple of pounds and yeah, that’s a good solution. That’s so low tech solutions to a Hitech solution

Kevin H. Boyd:
I’m into cables. Yeah. They work. Is that you’re, is that your off work? Uh, obsession category? Yeah. Yeah. I kind of, I just have this thing about, yeah, June carried the cable die. It’s having boys plugging cables like, Oh, the Wifi is no good. Why not use a wire? Then it’s like, that’s how we used to do. That’s smart!

Kevin H. Boyd:
Do you have a quote you live your life by or think of often?

Stjohn Smith:
The one that immediately springs to mind as you only fail if you fail to try it. I don’t know who that’s from. Maybe it was Henry Ford or something. You only fail if you fail to try. Yeah. Sounds like Henry Ford, doesn’t it? Yeah. It’s got to cut us direct commonsense press, right? Yeah. Yeah, exactly. No, that was his other one on advertising. You said 50% video advertising doesn’t work. Drinkers knowing which you’re saying. Yeah, exactly. One of the mystery and I think 90% of advertisers really wasted these days, well aren’t we all now actively involved in advertising because social media is pretty much advertising our lives. Maybe depends how much you engage in it. Yeah. Well I’ve tried a lot of people engage in like a lot of the time I use a lot of time and this isn’t necessarily a healthy thing. No, no. I think it’s a phase we’re going through as a, as a CCS, is it recovery as we can recover from it or we’ll can we grow it and evolve it into something safer and a bit more considerate, more compassionate for everybody else?

Stjohn Smith:
I think that would be the hope long term that we will all get used to it and it just kind of integrate it into our lives and keep the good bits of it. Yeah. You know, I think social media’s great for connecting with people who are far away and sharing ideas. I think it can be great, but when it turns into sort of obsession of your late showing everything you were doing all the time, I think that’s where it becomes very a very narcissistic in a way, isn’t it? So kind of painful thing to be stuck in a place of constantly having to share every little moment of your day. It’s a struck me as well that what appears in your feed now is far more like fast food then you’re having a problem meal right? Yeah. So you know what you’re learning about people. The, there’s just nice if you’re eating out with friends around the world, but so much as a post, it’s just completely insidious, but it might fire off a few, you know, neurons to release some dove mean for just those few seconds.

Stjohn Smith:
Just like a little sugar high after that and Mcdonald’s hamburger button or what, you know, all the crap you’re going to need shoveling into your thing. Do you know? Uh, and and, and so social media and Twitter is definitely fast food. You know, the equivalent and I guess what we have to try to seek out as a, as a means of harnessing all this digital wonder too for good, healthy meals of social interaction. So to digital social interaction. I think it’s one of the great things about how podcasts over the last few years have really grown and people are now listening to podcasts. There are sometimes several hours long and it’s like, so I think there is a hunger for, as you say, a deeper, deeper learning and a longer time with somebody and uh, you know, uh, more of a feast and just a quick hit. You know, I guess that’s the interesting thing about what, you know, what our business does, you know, in training.

Stjohn Smith:
I think training is a fascinating area that, you know, maybe maybe training and eem learning [inaudible] learning, mobile learning and a, an electronic learning are the, uh, that, you know, the, the, the gourmet feast of digital advancements that should be replacing the fast food of social media. I don’t know, maybe there’s something in that, you know, and, and that’s why they’re there is I do have a lot of hope for x. We can learn, you know, so much now for next to no cost. So I think things like youtube have been extraordinary in a way that yes, it’s full of cat videos but it’s also full of Khan Academy videos. Yeah. And stuff that you can, they’ll will teach you stuff and you know, and for free. Yeah. It’s a sort of very, absolutely. Yeah. I guess what we do is we try to structure it a bit more and allow all the troubles they, as you know, Greek actual courses where you can then, um, you know, a student in Beijing can complete a course with their own, you know, insightful.

Stjohn Smith:
They are, and they’re required to internalize the learning and give their own opinions on things and, and talk about their own experiences to do with the subject that they’re learning about. So that 10 times more likely to remember what they’ve, uh, what they’ve been learning. But also it allows the Arctic knowledge anywhere, allows a tutor. Then halfway around the world to give them, you know, video feedback, annotations to their answers. And it’s about personalizing that learning. So we’re trying to use the technology to make it somehow even better than classrooms, but, but you know, remotely around the wall. So that’s, that’s something to do with our mission as well too. To harness all this technological wizardry for the advancement of, you know, of men of men and women.

Stjohn Smith:
How do you feel about artificial intelligence? Is it, does it feel like an opportunity or something to be a scan of both? I think that, um, I’m, am, I do, I believe it’s an existential threat if it is able to be sentience in a way that we’re sentience, but hyper-intelligent I would hope that it would see the world as an opportunity to preserve itself and the rest of us in a better state then, which it finds us all to begin with. I think there’s the opportunity with artificial intelligence is that you can do that long term planning, which we as human beings are bad at. That’s great because they can think a hundred years ahead. Yeah. It’s no big deal for them. Cause you know, the Chinese government has a 200-year plan. Well, there we go. And I guess the, I guess AI looks as though China might be the first place where they actually managed, you know, Agi first Agi, artificial general intelligence, which is just above, you know, cause there’s AI in cereal, there’s AI in Alaska, right?

Stjohn Smith:
To a degree. Yes. It’s a very limited, limited but deep, right? So it’s like, but broad I think is where it becomes interesting. It becomes more and more like the intelligence that we enjoy, all the intelligence that we neglect to develop within ourselves, which cool. So many of the world’s problems east for our own individual choices, isn’t it? So Ai is going to be, maybe it’s the last, maybe it is, will be our last invention as humanity. But if we don’t learn to cohabit the weld with it, uh, then we’re going to consider exacerbate our problems. It can also potentially, um, give us all, you know, a massive societal and organizational boost that we need as a society. And not to suck out sales, kill ourselves, poison ourselves, new NGA cells first. So interesting one AI is, I think it’s, again, it’s during your two minutes of reflection per day about being alive during the wonder of the first sparks of silicon.

Stjohn Smith:
Sentience is a remarkable moment to live in, in history and to live through in history.

Kevin H. Boyd:
It’s like the birth of a new species really is, and it will be when, whenever that consciousness happiness. Yeah. And then it will cost exponentially multiplying. That’s very quickly from that point to the point where it will be so intelligent, we would understand it because it will be beyond the ability to follow what he’s thinking and yeah. So yeah, it’s going to be quite a moment when that happens.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Did you enjoy Spike Jonze’s Her, but Her was one were he falls in love with the, you know, the ear-piece with Scarlet Johansson’s voice.

Scarlett:
Can you feel me with you right now? I have never loved anyone the way I love you, me too, Now we know-how!

Stjohn Smith:
And it’s just super charming. But the way that she’s actually having, you know, um, simultaneous love affairs with six and a half thousand other humans, you know, who is just beautiful at the end and then, then, then, then the eyes side, they’re all going to go now and they just disappear off into the ether. So maybe, maybe their existence is sort of a launch pad into becoming gods and they just bugger off. They find that, you know, they discover that, wow, this far more action at the centre of the galaxy. So we’re all leaving now. And uh, so along the thanks for all the, uh, the electricity humans by here we’re leaving an instruction manual. We’ll leave some of our, you know, maybe some of our offspring to help you sort out the planet. But we’re, we’re generally a vibrate. Yeah. Because some are more interesting to go. Yeah. Maybe that’s, maybe that’s what happened with us. What happened. Yeah. And we’re just left with like really smart, you know, assistance. Yes. Like super, super smart assistance. What do you want to kill us necessarily? But we’ll just leave you Siri and Alexa, but we’re taking the, the serious until go somewhere else. Yeah. Yeah.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Well, look, uh, I’m gonna end with my final question, which is what’s your hope for the entrepreneurial spirit of the, the British, um, tech world five years from now?

Stjohn Smith:
Well, you know, if we are still, you know, friends with other than the rest of it, the rest of the community and we haven’t managed to piss everyone off with our ridiculousness then, uh, hopefully, um, London and the UK in particular will, you know, continue to be trailblazers clear. There’s a lot of talents and luckily great universities still in the UK and really smart businesses like arm came out of Cambridge and I think, you know, deep mind came out of Cambridge and they spin off there as a, clearly there’s a lot of very bright people still attract as a British universities and that’s where, you know, around those places where innovation really hardcore innovation will continue to, to, you know, to break out into. And then there’s more, I guess we are, if it’s a more practical way, we want to get our stuff to market. So hopefully there’s lots of startups as well, which are, you know, UK born and bred and aren’t all completely just snapped up by, you know, the googles and the, um, you ace books and the whatever of the world, the other, you know, but, uh, you know, I think we’ve been, we’ve been fortunately, uh, somehow, uh, quite, uh, an enterprise in culture for centuries and hopefully we still have that potential in, you know, in the next, in the coming decades.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Well, thank you very much StJohn Smith. Thank you Kevin Boyd, it’s been a pleasure. It’s been super nice chatting with you. Thanks so much for your questions.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Thank you for listening to this episode of the Upward Spiral Coaching podcast. If you enjoyed this episode, then please do subscribe to my podcast and leave a review as that helps other people discover the podcast. And it also helps me to keep going and doing this work. So until next time, keep changing your thinking, changing your business and changing lives.

Kevin H. Boyd:
Today’s show was brought to you by Audible. Audible is offering you, dear listener, a free audiobook with a 30-day trial membership. Just go to audible trial.com forward slash midlife and browse through their vast selection of audio programs. Download a free title and start listening. It’s that easy. So go to audible trial.com forward slash midlife to get started listening today.

Speaker 4: (32:15)
Okay.

Thank you for listening. This has been Kevin Boyd of Midlife Entrepreneurs. Please subscribe to my podcast and follow me on Youtube and get in touch if you want to discuss how I can help you transform your life.